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Ingolf Wunder

Die Zeit

Volker Hagedorn, 28.07.2011

 […] It doesn’t look that difficult, these few paw strokes across the octaves, then an urging spinning melody across sixteenth-waves. But in bar 54, a sixteenth scale in the right hand soughs from the sky, and after four such scales these superfast tones don’t seem to end. The youngling seems to be happy. The two hands are dancers, the right fingers fly through the final of Chopin’s last Piano Sonata sparklingly, as if it would be possible to go even quicker, if needed. No record-attempt, that’s expression. A drama is passing by, in which everything is drawn sharply, accents pick up one’s ear and life is fizzy. That’s how Ingolf Wunder plays on YouTube, when he was 20 years old. The Jury did’t like it, the young Austrian didn’t reach the finals of the Chopin Competition 2005, the world’s hardest and oldest Piano tournament. Five years later he came back and overtook everybody, even the winner. […] In Chopin he’s very interested in the question of the composers identity. “Truly Polish” he is supposed to be. “He wanted back to Poland, but couldn’t. That’s why his music is full of desire for something he couldn’t have” The music also has Parisian esprit though and ambiguity, and all that is at Wunder’s disposal. One can hear that on the CD in Opus 22. In the middle part of the Andante spianato he created an intimacy, that let’s time stop, in the Polonaise Sixth cascades are thrown down the stairs in fine hilarity, the “ornament-phrases” swing and appear at the same time as gestures, in which the essentials are casually outlined.[…]

Die Zeit

Volker Hagedorn, 28.07.2011

 […] It doesn’t look that difficult, these few paw strokes across the octaves, then an urging spinning melody across sixteenth-waves. But in bar 54, a sixteenth scale in the right hand soughs from the sky, and after four such scales these superfast tones don’t seem to end. The youngling seems to be happy. The two hands are dancers, the right fingers fly through the final of Chopin’s last Piano Sonata sparklingly, as if it would be possible to go even quicker, if needed. No record-attempt, that’s expression. A drama is passing by, in which everything is drawn sharply, accents pick up one’s ear and life is fizzy. That’s how Ingolf Wunder plays on YouTube, when he was 20 years old. The Jury did’t like it, the young Austrian didn’t reach the finals of the Chopin Competition 2005, the world’s hardest and oldest Piano tournament. Five years later he came back and overtook everybody, even the winner. […] In Chopin he’s very interested in the question of the composers identity. “Truly Polish” he is supposed to be. “He wanted back to Poland, but couldn’t. That’s why his music is full of desire for something he couldn’t have” The music also has Parisian esprit though and ambiguity, and all that is at Wunder’s disposal. One can hear that on the CD in Opus 22. In the middle part of the Andante spianato he created an intimacy, that let’s time stop, in the Polonaise Sixth cascades are thrown down the stairs in fine hilarity, the “ornament-phrases” swing and appear at the same time as gestures, in which the essentials are casually outlined.[…]