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Ingolf Wunder

Viennese classics

[...]At the conductors stand was the Venezuelan Domingo Hindoyan, the Austrian top pianist Ingolf Wunder was the acclaimed soloist with Mozart. Once again, the SOV proved to be an orchestra of European rank. The strings with the internationally renowned Polish concertmaster Pawel Zalejski at the top, the rich brass sound, the homogeneous sonority of the orchestra ... the guest on the podium, the world-wide South American conductor Domingo Hindoyan (38), was able to do so with clear gestures and sensitive musicality to present the three popular masters authentically (for Austrian listening habits). The Piano Concerto No. 21, C major, KV 467, by Mozart. The already highly esteemed top Austrian pianist, Ingolf Wunder, was the soloist. The award- winning artist played with perfect technique (Liszt specialist), captivating a sensitive touch despite sonorously “speaking” with the notes. Together with the compassionate orchestra, he created an overwhelming interpretation. At the heart of the concerto, the floating Andante (unfortunately misused as a film soundtrack) was celebrated by Ingolf Wunder in a completely unsentimental and inwardly tender manner. The artful cadenzas were written by the pianist himself. Two delicious encores by Mozart and Debussy were Ingolf s “thanks you” for the enthusiastic applause.

VOL.AT | 03.04.2018 | Edgar Schmidt

Viennese classics

[...]At the conductors stand was the Venezuelan Domingo Hindoyan, the Austrian top pianist Ingolf Wunder was the acclaimed soloist with Mozart. Once again, the SOV proved to be an orchestra of European rank. The strings with the internationally renowned Polish concertmaster Pawel Zalejski at the top, the rich brass sound, the homogeneous sonority of the orchestra ... the guest on the podium, the world-wide South American conductor Domingo Hindoyan (38), was able to do so with clear gestures and sensitive musicality to present the three popular masters authentically (for Austrian listening habits). The Piano Concerto No. 21, C major, KV 467, by Mozart. The already highly esteemed top Austrian pianist, Ingolf Wunder, was the soloist. The award- winning artist played with perfect technique (Liszt specialist), captivating a sensitive touch despite sonorously “speaking” with the notes. Together with the compassionate orchestra, he created an overwhelming interpretation. At the heart of the concerto, the floating Andante (unfortunately misused as a film soundtrack) was celebrated by Ingolf Wunder in a completely unsentimental and inwardly tender manner. The artful cadenzas were written by the pianist himself. Two delicious encores by Mozart and Debussy were Ingolf s “thanks you” for the enthusiastic applause.

VOL.AT | 03.04.2018 | Edgar Schmidt