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Ingolf Wunder

Welcome to the Mozart Olympus

INSPIRED NATURALNESS

The magic of music with Markus Stenz and Ingolf Wunder

Ingolf Wunder, 30, is not a boastful pianobeast, not a virtuoso who is intoxicated by the thunder of chords and sparkles of arpeggios. That’s why on Sunday evening his encore wasn’t the spark striking Sigismund Thalberg transcription of Vincenzo Bellinis Normas aria "Casta Diva", but instead he took a bow before the chaste goddess with all humility and tenderness. He let the Steinway gently sing in the footsteps of the Bellini admirer Chopin and created the enraptured magic of this splendid music out of the beauty of the vocal line and the silence, which he never left further than it was needed.

The musicality of this perseveringly demanded encore exemplifies the piano-playing of the young Austrian, whose culture of the subtle touch was unmistakably influenced by his mentor, the still unmatched Chopin specialist, Adam Harasiewicz.

Before that Wunder took us out of this world and into the skies with his Mozarts C major Piano Concerto KV 467, with the same delicacy and stylistic assurance, the same scrupulous avoidance of unnecessary effect .

Mozart is complicated. And the more popular a piece is, the more complicated it becomes. This Piano Concerto is one of the most popular: therefore much violence has been done to the magically floating Andante. It often sounds sentimental, almost always sweet and as a result usually too harmless and insignificant. But with Wunder the right hand sings in sonorous intimacy, while the chord repetitions in the left hand do the magic. Nothing sounds put-on, nothing too much and nothing insincere in his inspired naturalness. This also applies to his own cadenzas that this extraordinary pianist gave to the 1st and 3rd movements. These were symphonically developed, almost strict in their contrapuntal precision and formal sophistication and musically so rich that one would have liked them to be even longer. One cannot praise enough the fact alone that a young pianist steps onto the thin ice of autonomous “cadencing”.

In the Allegro maestoso as well as the Allegro vivace, from which the solo cadenza beautifully arises, the following applies: For Ingolf Wunder music is everything and the technique (which is of course flawless) is only a means to an end. Welcome to the Mozart-Olympus next to Zacharias and Buchbinder.

The MDR-Orchestra would also not do too badly up there, which accompanied very responsive and aromatically under the direction of Markus Stenz, who jumped in for the injured Dennis Russell Davies. The radio orchestra around concertmaster Andreas Hartmann willingly absorbed the creative impulses of Stenz and the pianist and took them into the tutti, engraving the precious lines with a silver pen and reacted sensitively to Wunder’s wonderful play of colors.

26.01.2016 | Leipziger Volkszeitung

Author: Peter Korfmacher
Also published in: Döbelner Allgemeine Zeitung, Leipziger Volkszeitung Delitzsch- Ellenburg, Leipziger Volkszeitung

Welcome to the Mozart Olympus

INSPIRED NATURALNESS

The magic of music with Markus Stenz and Ingolf Wunder

Ingolf Wunder, 30, is not a boastful pianobeast, not a virtuoso who is intoxicated by the thunder of chords and sparkles of arpeggios. That’s why on Sunday evening his encore wasn’t the spark striking Sigismund Thalberg transcription of Vincenzo Bellinis Normas aria "Casta Diva", but instead he took a bow before the chaste goddess with all humility and tenderness. He let the Steinway gently sing in the footsteps of the Bellini admirer Chopin and created the enraptured magic of this splendid music out of the beauty of the vocal line and the silence, which he never left further than it was needed.

The musicality of this perseveringly demanded encore exemplifies the piano-playing of the young Austrian, whose culture of the subtle touch was unmistakably influenced by his mentor, the still unmatched Chopin specialist, Adam Harasiewicz.

Before that Wunder took us out of this world and into the skies with his Mozarts C major Piano Concerto KV 467, with the same delicacy and stylistic assurance, the same scrupulous avoidance of unnecessary effect .

Mozart is complicated. And the more popular a piece is, the more complicated it becomes. This Piano Concerto is one of the most popular: therefore much violence has been done to the magically floating Andante. It often sounds sentimental, almost always sweet and as a result usually too harmless and insignificant. But with Wunder the right hand sings in sonorous intimacy, while the chord repetitions in the left hand do the magic. Nothing sounds put-on, nothing too much and nothing insincere in his inspired naturalness. This also applies to his own cadenzas that this extraordinary pianist gave to the 1st and 3rd movements. These were symphonically developed, almost strict in their contrapuntal precision and formal sophistication and musically so rich that one would have liked them to be even longer. One cannot praise enough the fact alone that a young pianist steps onto the thin ice of autonomous “cadencing”.

In the Allegro maestoso as well as the Allegro vivace, from which the solo cadenza beautifully arises, the following applies: For Ingolf Wunder music is everything and the technique (which is of course flawless) is only a means to an end. Welcome to the Mozart-Olympus next to Zacharias and Buchbinder.

The MDR-Orchestra would also not do too badly up there, which accompanied very responsive and aromatically under the direction of Markus Stenz, who jumped in for the injured Dennis Russell Davies. The radio orchestra around concertmaster Andreas Hartmann willingly absorbed the creative impulses of Stenz and the pianist and took them into the tutti, engraving the precious lines with a silver pen and reacted sensitively to Wunder’s wonderful play of colors.

26.01.2016 | Leipziger Volkszeitung

Author: Peter Korfmacher
Also published in: Döbelner Allgemeine Zeitung, Leipziger Volkszeitung Delitzsch- Ellenburg, Leipziger Volkszeitung