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Ingolf Wunder

Zürich Zagesanzeiger

[…]As if it would come out of nowhere, floats the “Andante Spianato et Grande Polonaise brilliante” into the world. The one wanting too much here, loses this floating of the beginning. The 26 year old pianist Ingolf Wunder resists a too emotional colored urge of interpretation. One feels a warm, pulsating flow with a singing, rich sound. Wunder listens to the velvet-outlined theme of the Andante spianato with a mild nonchalance and manages without foggy “sound-clouds”. One could assume that the second Prizewinner of the big Warsaw Chopin Competition posses extraordinary abilities. But his Interpretations of Chopin in the forth Ballad as well as in the “Grande Polonaise brilliante” being so well balanced, both powerful and poetic, and fortunately showing only a bit of blank virtuosity, that the young pianist generation like to present, really surprises. Also with Liszt, where you need “octopuses-hands” to master pieces like the 6th Valse Caprice or the 6th Rhapsody, the music doesn’t sound like a pianistic “tour de force” but like a personal statement[…]

Tom Hellat, 24.10.2011

Zürich Zagesanzeiger

[…]As if it would come out of nowhere, floats the “Andante Spianato et Grande Polonaise brilliante” into the world. The one wanting too much here, loses this floating of the beginning. The 26 year old pianist Ingolf Wunder resists a too emotional colored urge of interpretation. One feels a warm, pulsating flow with a singing, rich sound. Wunder listens to the velvet-outlined theme of the Andante spianato with a mild nonchalance and manages without foggy “sound-clouds”. One could assume that the second Prizewinner of the big Warsaw Chopin Competition posses extraordinary abilities. But his Interpretations of Chopin in the forth Ballad as well as in the “Grande Polonaise brilliante” being so well balanced, both powerful and poetic, and fortunately showing only a bit of blank virtuosity, that the young pianist generation like to present, really surprises. Also with Liszt, where you need “octopuses-hands” to master pieces like the 6th Valse Caprice or the 6th Rhapsody, the music doesn’t sound like a pianistic “tour de force” but like a personal statement[…]

Tom Hellat, 24.10.2011